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Best book for linux basics

Hey, I'm looking for a selection of books to help with understanding linux, it's filing system, scripting in bash and maybe some more stuff if you can suggest it.

Suggest a resource

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The Linux Command Line: A Complete Introduction

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You've experienced the shiny, point-and-click surface of your Linux computer—now dive below and explore its depths with the power of the command line. The Linux Command Line takes you from your very first terminal keystrokes to writing full programs in Bash, the most popular Linux shell. Along the way you'll learn the timeless skills handed down by generations of gray-bearded, mouse-shunning gurus: file navigation, environment configuration, command chaining, pattern matching with regular expressions, and more. In addition to that practical knowledge, author William Shotts reveals the philosophy behind these tools and the rich heritage that your desktop Linux machine has inherited from Unix supercomputers of yore. As you make your way through the book's short, easily-digestible chapters, you'll learn how to: Create and delete files, directories, and symlinks Administer your system, including networking, package installation, and process management Use standard input and output, redirection, and pipelines Edit files with Vi, the world's most popular text editor Write shell scripts to automate common or boring tasks Slice and dice text files with cut, paste, grep, patch, and sed Once you overcome your initial "shell shock," you'll find that the command line is a natural and expressive way to communicate with your computer. Just don't be surprised if your mouse starts to gather dust.

As a 20+ year Unix power user I really didn't expect to be so pleased with this book. It covers a lot of ground thoroughly and succinctly. Not only has it filled a few important gaps in my Linux knowledge, I have been able to recommend it to my son who is just starting to get into Linux.

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Unix in a Nutshell, Fourth Edition

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As an open operating system, Unix can be improved on by anyone and everyone: individuals, companies, universities, and more. As a result, the very nature of Unix has been altered over the years by numerous extensions formulated in an assortment of versions. Today, Unix encompasses everything from Sun's Solaris to Apple's Mac OS X and more varieties of Linux than you can easily name.

The latest edition of this bestselling reference brings Unix into the 21st century. It's been reworked to keep current with the broader state of Unix in today's world and highlight the strengths of this operating system in all its various flavors.

Detailing all Unix commands and options, the informative guide provides generous descriptions and examples that put those commands in context. Here are some of the new features you'll find in Unix in a Nutshell, Fourth Edition:

  • Solaris 10, the latest version of the SVR4-based operating system, GNU/Linux, and Mac OS X
  • Bash shell (along with the 1988 and 1993 versions of ksh)
  • tsch shell (instead of the original Berkeley csh)
  • Package management programs, used for program installation on popular GNU/Linux systems, Solaris and Mac OS X
  • GNU Emacs Version 21
  • Introduction to source code management systems
  • Concurrent versions system
  • Subversion version control system
  • GDB debugger

As Unix has progressed, certain commands that were once critical have fallen into disuse. To that end, the book has also dropped material that is no longer relevant, keeping it taut and current.

If you're a Unix user or programmer, you'll recognize the value of this complete, up-to-date Unix reference. With chapter overviews, specific examples, and detailed command.

its a good book to carry around and read on the metro and get a quick refresher course. Its not comprehensive but of course its a pocket book. it does what its intended to do: as a quick reference. I would not recommend it to someone new to shells, some experience would help. Wish there were little bit more examples in it though explaining some of the commands.

great for learning bash scripting!!

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Linux for Beginners: An Introduction to the Linux Operating System and Command Line

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If you want to learn how to use Linux, but don't know where to start read on.

Knowing where to start when learning a new skill can be a challenge, especially when the topic seems so vast. There can be so much information available that you can't even decide where to start. Or worse, you start down the path of learning and quickly discover too many concepts, commands, and nuances that aren't explained. This kind of experience is frustrating and leaves you with more questions than answers.


Linux for Beginners
doesn't make any assumptions about your background or knowledge of Linux. You need no prior knowledge to benefit from this book. You will be guided step by step using a logical and systematic approach. As new concepts, commands, or jargon are encountered they are explained in plain language, making it easy for anyone to understand.


Here is what you will learn by reading Linux for Beginners:

  • How to get access to a Linux server if you don't already.

  • What a Linux distribution is and which one to choose.

  • What software is needed to connect to Linux from Mac and Windows computers. Screenshots included.

  • What SSH is and how to use it, including creating and using SSH keys.

  • The file system layout of Linux systems and where to find programs, configurations, and documentation.

  • The basic Linux commands you'll use most often.

  • Creating, renaming, moving, and deleting directories.

  • Listing, reading, creating, editing, copying, and deleting files.

  • Exactly how permissions work and how to decipher the most cryptic Linux permissions with ease.

  • How to use the nano, vi, and emacs editors.

  • Two methods to search for files and directories.

  • How to compare the contents of files.

  • What pipes are, why they are useful, and how to use them.

  • How to compress files to save space and make transferring data easy.

  • How and why to redirect input and output from applications.

  • How to customize your shell prompt.

  • How to be efficient at the command line by using aliases, tab completion, and your shell history.

  • How to schedule and automate jobs using cron.

  • How to switch users and run processes as others.

  • Where to go for even more in-depth coverage on each topic.
What you learn in "Linux for Beginners" applies to any Linux environment including Ubuntu, Debian, Linux Mint, RedHat, Fedora, OpenSUSE, Slackware, and more.

Scroll up, click the Buy Now With 1 Click button and get started learning Linux today!

Not the best for a total beginner but I reckon once you've read through the other suggestions and had some experimentation time with the system you should be able to fly through this book. Maybe think about getting this and having a look and if you like a steep learning curve then use this, it'll pay off.